Milton Yergens art opening brings attention to Dave Thune’s gallery

“I drank Southern Comfort with Janis Joplin. But I also authored our first human rights ordinance back in 1980,” Thune said.

City councilman Dave Thune hosted the opening reception for artist Milton Yergens at the St. Paul Gallery, Thune Studio, last night.

Thune and Yergens have both been active participants in the artist social scene for most of their lives. Now, Thune uses his studio on West 7th as an outlet for art when he’s not orchestrating the next political movement.

“I drank Southern Comfort with Janis Joplin. But I also authored our first human rights ordinance back in 1980,” Thune said.

Yergens’ work featured scenes of distorted classic cars and one highly-saturated vision of the Harley-Davidson Twin-V.

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Artwork by Dave Thune

“I try to get a different perspective on things, I take easily recognizable everyday objects and make them clashable.” His work fits in well among the other eclectic art throughout the city.

Yergens takes a different approach to his artwork. Instead of the traditional brush and canvas, Yergens elects to use the iPad app Inspire.

As owner and operator of Thune Studio, Thune adds his own flavor to the gallery. On opening night, he offered snacks and drinks to guests as they dipped strawberries into piles of powdered sugar and shouldered past one another to get involved in the conversation. Debra and Michael Padgett were present, among others vying for a glass of sangria.

“I try to get a different perspective on things, I take easily recognizable everyday objects and make them clashable.” His work fits in well among the other eclectic art throughout the city.

The event made a good excuse for acquaintances and fellow artists to share in close quarters, and the door to Burn Unit was also open for the night, leading guests straight into Thune’s gallery.

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In the window of the Thune Studio

“It’s been in four or five different locations now, and as a unexpected result of the economy, I moved here. That was back in ’87.”

Tucked away in the back of the shop is a charming collection of smaller pieces, some of which were created by Thune’s children. “That’s my daughter’s,” he said as he pointed to a model of a heart in a box, made from latex and lard. “We’re all artists in my family.”

Thune switches out the art in his gallery every six weeks. The next showing presents the work of Cameron Peterson, which will be available to the public around Aug. 23.

Come down to Thune’s studio, located between the Burn Unit coffee shop and another art gallery the Artista Bottega, and see Milton Yergens’ work for yourself. 

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