Is UCF a “trashy” university?

via admissions.ucf.edu
via admissions.ucf.edu

UCF has been called a lot of things, some of which are derogatory in nature.

Slogans suggesting UCF stands for “You Can’t Finish” have branded the university.

While the marketing department paints a picture of luxury on a canvas where students can relax and enjoy the scenery as they study for class, one professor has written an article depicting the campus as a place where refuse takes refuge.

“It was always frustrating, making my way from the garage and seeing all this indiscriminate trash,” said Rich Sloane, professor at UCF and writer of the Huffington Post article, “It wasn’t a pigsty, but I saw this banana peel sitting on a ledge not far from a trash can, and if that student could take two extra steps and throw it away, it would make a big difference,” Sloane said.

Sloane has tried to implement his movement titled, “Ben Dover,” where if only 100 out of the 60,000 students were to bend over and pick up a piece of trash each day, the campus would be a lot cleaner than it is, he said.

“It was sort of tongue-in-cheek, I’d say. I think we have a beautiful, very attractive campus. It’s well maintained. We have great employees who pick up after us, we just need to be more considerate on the part of the rest of us who make the mess,” Sloane said.

The campus itself is lush with laurel oaks and fields of green springing up alongside the sidewalks and breezeways.

There are only occasional instances where garbage can be seen strewn about.

Brittaney Hubble, Health Sciences sophomore, said, “They’re pretty clean, there’s always somewhere to recycle inside the buildings and we have tons of trash cans outside. Maybe if they put more recycle bins outdoors, that would helpful.”

In a public PowerPoint found on the UCF Waste Management website, the author suggests there are management and financing issues to be considered.

The bullet points show that trash maintenance is a low priority to the department. Employees are resistance to change and adapt to new technologies.

The website shows there’s a lack of quality management as well.

According to, maintenance costs are $35,000 annually for automated services, $15,000 for semi-automated services and $8,000 for manual labor allotted in the university’s budget.

There are strategies in place to increase awareness of the trend so students become conscious of the fact they leave drop their trash wherever they like instead of taking the time to carry it to the nearest receptacle.

“I went to the last big game and and the second students were done tailgating, people came en masse to clean up every single blade of grass,” said Tim Blinde, Social Work senior.

“They were pretty fastidious about it. I wouldn’t say the campus is trashy, if anything, the Ben Dover movement should be targeting individuals not the campus itself,” Blinde said.

Alexandra Kennedy, Facility Operations coordinator, told Sloane that 2,342 tons of solid waste is being shipped to landfills from UCF each year.

That breaks down to 4.5 pounds each day.

Despite the figures, UCF’s Student Government Association is working to turn the university into a healthy and safety place to earn a degree. On Thursdays in the Student Union, members of SGA can be heard encouraging students to use the hand dryers located near the exit to most bathrooms, as opposed to wasting paper towels in order to dry off hands.

Julia Felter, the Environment and Sustainability expert for SGA, started this operation called “UCF Goes Green on Thursdays.”

“I think the campus is nice,” said Kajja Kelly, Health Sciences junior. “I don’t think it’s trashy at all,” Kelly said.

Let us know what you think of the campus in the comments section below.

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